bikepackingtrev

Three Became One

It started the same way it usually does, a group message on BookFace asking if anyone was up for a wild camp at the weekend. The usual suspects duly replying and so the anticipation and excitement levels start to grow. The weather is not good but the forecast for the weekend looks ok.

By the end of the week three of us have planned for a ride out onto Dartmoor and a wild camp. I’m disorganized and preoccupied with the constant overflow from the day job, add to that my elderly father being unwell and I forget to pack until Friday morning before I have to ride to work. Luckily the bags are still packed from the last trip, so I just load it all onto the new Gypsy and ride to work. The custom bag I had made for the B’Stard frame fits with plenty of room to spare in the Gypsy’s main triangle and leaves room to keep the water bottle mount. I’ve added another bottle below the down tube and still have room for another two on the front fork legs if needed.

It rains on and off all day Friday, I make the most of a dry spell during my lunch break to shop for sausages and fresh bread for my dinner, oh and a couple of beers of course.

During the day one of the group backed out due to other commitments, so it’s down to two of us for the trip. That’s fine as we all use hammocks and finding a clearing where we can all get into is not always easy. As I leave work the clouds are gradually clearing and there is a promise of better weather ahead. I ride out to Yelverton on the edge of Dartmoor when I receive a message from my buddy saying his cassette has died and he won’t be making it after all, I ponder my choices for a while before deciding to go on alone. So three became one, and I headed out onto the moors in search of peace, solitude and a nice spot to camp. 

We have a favourite area in the woodland to the North West of Sheepstor, when I get there I find a group of teenagers already set up and smoking dope (which they desperately try to cover up when I rock up and say hi). I make sure I’m just intimidating enough to give them mild paranoia, smile to myself and go in search of somewhere peaceful well away from them. After looking around at a few potential but just not quite right sites I finally settle on a spot between three trees, it’s sheltered from the prevailing wind but still open enough to let the sunlight in.

After clearing away a few small branches I string my hammock and tarp up and then collect some rocks to surround my fire pit. I spend time collecting the driest twigs and branches off the ground, theres a lot here as there has been recent logging activity.

I’m always glad when I’ve cooled off from the ride and then changed out of my cycling kit and into my camp clothes, now I’m warm dry and comfortable, ready to settle in for the evening. first job is to get a pot of fresh coffee on the go.

I brought barbecue charcoal to cook on, it’s easier to get started and gives a good even heat for cooking. I arrange all the fire wood I have gathered beside my fire pit. I found some nice straight wet branches that I’ve cleaned up (they are going to be my cooking rack). I get the charcoal lit and open a can of IPA while I wait for the fire to warm up.

It’s pretty peaceful out here now as the shadows get longer, the last of the days walkers are heading back to their cars to head home. I’m pleased that I can’t hear the stoners up the hill, now the only sound is the wind in the trees and blackbirds singing.

As the fire warms up I arrange the wet sticks into a rack and lay out my sausages on skewers across them, the smell of the sausages slowly starting to cook makes me realize just how hungry I really am.

The IPA is going down really well, I remind myself I only have two cans for the whole evening and slow down trying to make the beer last a little bit longer.

While I lie on the floor beside the campfire with my sausages cooking, I listen to the sound of owls squawking as they work their way up the valley. It takes longer than I thought for the sausages to cook, the fire takes a long time to get to Full heat.

Now the sausages are spitting fat and it catches in the flames flaring likes small flamethrowers, I'm so mesmerized by the site that I almost let the sausages burn. I brought some nice crusty bread rolls with me and I break them open now ready to put my dinner in. There's nothing quite so rewarding as cooking your dinner on open fire in the middle of nowhere, this really is back to basics and I absolutely love it. It's camping like this that really grounds me, there's nothing quite like being alone in the woods with your campfire and you dinner cooking on it. I wish every day could be like this, just me, my bike and the Woods.

Life is never that simple and the reality of work always ends up getting in the way.

With the last of the evening sun nearly gone, I prepped my sleeping bag and all my clothes ready for the next day, I want to be sure that everything is sorted and tidied out of the way before the dark comes. There's nothing worse than looking to something in the pitch black and not knowing where it is. I check my sausages again, then nearly cooked so I turn them over a couple times, get my bread rolls ready and open my last can of beer.

In the distance I can hear owls coming up the valley, from the sound of it I'm going to have company tonight.

After finishing my dinner and the last of my beer I start making preparations to bed. I've been drying out more firewood around the edge of the fire which I had low deliberately so that I didn't burn my food. Now I start to add a reasonable amount of wood and build the fire up, is not long before It's roaring away.

I lie down beside the fire and staying its warmth for another hour or two all the time listening to the owls as they get closer and closer. I carefully stack the fire so that nothing will fall out during the night and get into my sleeping bag on my hammock, zipping the hammock up and leaving it just my head sticking out. I can now see the moon as the clouds start clear and the stars are shining brightly.

I gradually drift off to sleep with a gentle breeze stirring the hammock in a gentle rocking motion. I must've slept deeply, as I'm awoken with the start, there is an owl sitting on a branch just above where my hammock is tied on. I watched the owl for about an hour as it flew from branch to branch calling to other owls that gradually made there way into the little clearing, each of them are adding to the cacophony of sound that now filled the woods. I eventually got back to sleep and had probably the best nights sleep that I have had in a very long time.

When I eventually woke up, the sun was already up and I could hear rustling beside my sleeping bag. I carefully peered over the edge only to find a grey squirrel sitting on the grass beside me gently pulling grass fronds, And shaking the seeds out of them. The squirrel was completely oblivious to me, and I watched it for some 30 minutes or so before I eventually got up and started getting breakfast and coffee on the go.

I take my time packing up the camp making sure that I have picked up all of my belongings, when I have my bike fully loaded and all my bags packed, I spend another half-hour cleaning up the site until there is no trace that I was ever there.

It's Saturday and the day of the local village fair, so I ride down my favourite track called Banana run. It's a steep twisty singletrack that drops from the top of the reservoir all the way to the river below, the weight of the bike with all the camping equipment giving me extra speed as I fly down the whoops and swoops before crossing the river and heading for the track that takes me all the way into the village of Meavy.

After the peace and solitude of the moors and woodlands I am now bombarded with the noise of a village fair in full swing. It's not long before I find my friend Sam and we lock our bikes together before heading for the bar. We are here to cheer on our friend Paul who has entered the Meavy Horseshoe run. We drink beer and eat burgers and chat and mingle as more friends gradually arrive, the race has already started and we are here for the finish. We cheer on as the first runners come in, it's not long before Paul crosses the line and we celebrate with more beer. I decide to cycle home while I can still stand, as the beer has been going down very well. I of course take the long way home and enjoy those final minutes on my own just me and bike. It's on this final stretch of the ride home that I realize my Gypsy has become my best friend. I hope there will be many more adventurous with this fantastic bicycle.

Follow Trev's adventures on his Gypsy and B'Stard on Instagram @bikepackingtrev and on the Penhale Facebook page @penhalebicycleco

Soul:Ride

Wake:Up

It all starts with the realisation that depression is starting to take me, the stresses of daily life has been building for months. I’m slowly being worn down, eroded, changing me into someone I do want to be. I’ve let life get in the way and stopped doing the things that are important, cycling is one of those things, when I stop cycling I know I have a problem that needs to be resolved quickly. I’ve not ridden with the club for weeks, I miss the banter, I miss being pushed to my limit, I miss the Jelly Snakes.

It’s time to ride

Self:Motivation

So I got the itchy feet thing going on, I’ve had a few crap weeks and I need to de stress myself. That’s when the thoughts start to wander, thinking of big rides in far off places. Riding through big empty landscapes with nothing but my thoughts and my bike for company. Well that’s all a long way off and sounds expensive, plus I won’t get away with taking time out for another trip until I’ve taken my partner Alice away for a proper holiday.

I’m lucky enough to live in Plymouth, on the edge of the Dartmoor National Park so why not make use of it. So it’s Thursday, I’m tired and I’m fed up at work. That makes my mind up for me, I can pack the bike when I get home and ride it to work fully loaded with all my camping kit. That way I can head out straight from work on Friday, I can get a night under the stars and some much needed mental down time.

I want to practice using my camera for time lapse and video before my big Summer Solstice ride. I set about shooting time lapse in the back yard of me prepping the bike ready for camping. I want to be able to tell a story without talking, I want to relay that sense of tranquillity and peacefulness you only get when you’re truly alone. Most of all I want to capture the feeling of the moors, it’s timelessness, its history. It is a beautiful place.

I ride a Penhale Bicycle Co. “B’Stard”, a gorgeous little steel framed hardtail prototype. I have a custom made frame bag, the rest of my bike bags are all from Alpkit. Their stuff is really well made and not too expensive.

After fitting all the bags and packing everything I need for an overnighter I head in to charge batteries for my Nikon and grind enough coffee beans to keep me going on my little trip. I just ordered a GoPro from my favourite bike shop Rockin Bikes at Yelverton, if it arrives during the day on Friday I’ll pick it up on the way to the moors. I have a spare 64Gb memory card ready to fit into it.

Day:One

Friday morning, it’s dull and grey and looks like rain is on the way. I grab the rest of my kit and head out for work early to try and beat the rain, The bike is heavy but still feels good. I get to work just before the rain moves in, so far things are going in my favour. I check the forecast and am pleased to see it’s due to clear up in the afternoon with a nice sunny evening with only light winds. I start to think about where I’ll ride and more importantly where I’ll camp.

Initially I decide the camp should be in Outholme Wood, just to the east of Sheeps Tor. I know there is a stream there where I can have an easy source of water. But this will leave me in the shade most of the evening, after a quick check of the map I decide camp should be in the small valley where Devonport Leat emerges from a tunnel not far from Nuns Cross and White Works Cottage. I know there is a stone cross that I will be able to feature in a time lapse of the sun setting behind it. The valley is sheltered but quite high up on the Moor and will leave me a good view out over the landscape and the setting sun. Devonport Leat runs with clear fresh water year round (I’ll still use my Sawyer inline filter though, you can never be too sure) so plenty of water for fresh coffee.

So that’s about as much planning as I need to do, now I just have to get through the day in the office. Now that I know where I’m going and have all my kit with me I just want to head off. Clock watching is mind numbingly infuriating, time to try and focus on project plans and contracts.

Eleven:Thirty approaches, so does the rain. It gradually gets harder as the wind picks up, colleagues start ribbing me about why anyone would want to go out riding and camping in this weather. The forecast will be right, the sun will come out. I will go regardless, as I know as soon as I’m out there it will all be worth it no matter what the weather throws at me. But there will be sun, I know there will.

Twelve:Thirty Still it rains. It rains hard and the wind is fresh

One:Thirty The clouds break up, the sun comes out and the wind gradually starts to ease off. Things really are looking up, I rang Rockin Bikes, James lets me know the delivery has not arrived yet. If it arrives before I leave James has agreed to unbox it and start it charging so I can use it on the way out. I have an Anker charger with me that has enough power to charge the GoPro and my iPhone a couple of times but it would be better to have it charged before I go.

Only a couple of hours to go, more tea needed. I’m finding it impossible to concentrate on work. I’m planning the shoot for the timelapse sequence in my head, I just hope the weather leaves me with a good sunset. If the skies stay clear I’ll have a go at capturing the Milky Way as it tracks across the sky. Where I’m planning to camp is reasonably well protected from light pollution, fingers crossed it stays clear.

Three:Fifty Only ten minutes left before the off, no phone call from Rockin Bikes, so I’m not hopeful they have received their delivery. Oh well I still have my Nikon. The wind has picked up again but at least it’s dry, although if the wind keeps blowing like this I will have to camp at Outholme after all. The other site will be too exposed as the wind will be whistling up the valley.

Four: PM I lock my PC get changed into my cycling kit and grab my bike from the bike shed. The sun is out as I head out away from work, I head through Roborough and then hang a right and drop downhill to Bickleigh, passing the 42 Commando’s barracks as I go. I hit the cycle track (route 27) and head for Yelverton, the bike is heavy but well balanced with my camping kit spaced out evenly between the three bags I use. I roll into RockinBikes after about forty minutes of riding, good news. James had received the GoPro, unboxed it and put it on charge for me. We have a slight issue when he tries to switch it on, it’s dead. After a short panic from James that he’s been sent a duff unit, he opens the back cover to find that he forgot to fit the battery. I rib him for a while because that’s what friends do. His turn to laugh at me, I go to fit the memory card only to find I have the wrong size. There is nowhere within ten miles that sells the card I need. Oh well I have my Nikon D3200, three batteries and two 64Gb memory cards. I pay the man and head off towards Burrator Reservoir.

I ride to the left of the road on a track that lifts me higher up and provides great views out over the reservoir. I ride in glorious sunshine before dropping down and joining the Widowmaker Trail. I ride up this rock strewn track for a mile or so, until it’s crossed by Devonport Leat. This is where I turn right and follow this old watercourse as it meanders across the moors, I’m following it upstream in the late evening sun. The wind is easing off so it looks like it’ll be ok to camp up here instead the low level camp behind Sheeps Tor. After a while I come to the old stone cross (insert Reference) I keep on going and as I round the bend I see my campsite. Two old beach trees next to a small ruined building, it’s fallen down granite block walls barely more than a few feet high. I roll into the small flat area in front of the ruin and the trees, this will be home for the night. The view is amazing looking back down over the rolling moors towards Sheeps Tor in the distance, the shadows are getting longer and the light is changing; taking on an orange glow. Looks like it’s going to be a good sunset. I unpack the Nikon, tripod and interval timer. It’s time to get a quick bit of video before I start my first timelapse. I take a quick shot of me riding into camp then set the camera up to start the time lapse, I want to capture me rolling in and setting up my little camp for the night. I need to work quickly as I really want to capture the sun setting behind the stone cross.

I ride to the left of the road on a track that lifts me higher up and provides great views out over the reservoir. I ride in glorious sunshine before dropping down and joining the Widowmaker Trail. I ride up this rock strewn track for a mile or so, until it’s crossed by Devonport Leat. This is where I turn right and follow this old watercourse as it meanders across the moors, I’m following it upstream in the late evening sun. The wind is easing off so it looks like it’ll be ok to camp up here instead the low level camp behind Sheeps Tor. After a while I come to the old stone cross (insert Reference) I keep on going and as I round the bend I see my campsite. Two old beach trees next to a small ruined building, it’s fallen down granite block walls barely more than a few feet high. I roll into the small flat area in front of the ruin and the trees, this will be home for the night. The view is amazing looking back down over the rolling moors towards Sheeps Tor in the distance, the shadows are getting longer and the light is changing; taking on an orange glow. Looks like it’s going to be a good sunset. I unpack the Nikon, tripod and interval timer. It’s time to get a quick bit of video before I start my first timelapse. I take a quick shot of me riding into camp then set the camera up to start the time lapse, I want to capture me rolling in and setting up my little camp for the night. I need to work quickly as I really want to capture the sun setting behind the stone cross.

I’m using my little Vango one man tent for the first time, turns out it’s very quick and easy to put up. In no time at all I have the tent up, bed roll inflated and sleeping bag in and ready for use. I grab my stove and cooking pots out of the frame bag and go to fetch water for a coffee. I bring the water to a rolling boil, just to be on the safe side. 

You never know what’s fallen in and died upstream. I have a Sawyer inline water filter with me which I use to refill my Camelback, this great little filter gets rid of microbial as well as particulate contaminationWith camp set up and a fresh coffee brewing I head off to set the camera up for some time lapse, I find a great spot back along the track I rode in on. I set the camera up, switch the auto focus off and start the interval timer running. I’m shooting at one frame per second, when I stitch it all together at home I’ll play it back at between thirty and sixty frames per second. I want the movement of the clouds passing over to be smooth and fluid.  

With the camera set and running I head back to camp to cook some food, then decide to take the stove and dinner back to the camera. The interval timer will only take 400 shots before it needs resetting, I don’t want to risk it stopping while I’m cooking.

It turns out to be a fabulous sunset, the weather has been great so far. As the light fails I head back to camp and find my hip flask full of Sloe Gin. I pack up and get into my tent to bed down for the night as I go to pull the zip of the flysheet up I seen a heron fly low overhead, I lie there for a while listening to cuckoos in the distance.

A fairly perfect end to the day. 

Day:Two

I’m awake early, it’s starting to get light at around four thirty, I lay there in the warm comfort of my sleeping bag until just after five. It’s no good, I’m awake so I decide to get up and get the coffee on. I’m glad for this choice as soon as I’m out of the tent, the light is magical. The ground is covered in a heavy layer of dew, as I look up the valley towards the rising sun the ground appears silver and sparkles in the low morning light. I go to get water for coffee and I am struck by the beauty of the scene before me. This is Dartmoor in all of its ancient magical beauty, being up before the sun burns off the dew, provides me with some great photos.

After a couple of cups of coffee I cook chili and rice for breakfast, ok so I don’t exactly cook it I just warm it up. Anyway it tastes good and fills a gap. By now the sun has started to rise properly and the dew on the tent is drying, I’ll soon be able to start packing it up.

I set the camera up on the bank above camp and start the interval timer again, more time lapse. 

After packing up camp and taking some video of me leaving, I take one final look at where I camped. I’m pleased to say you could not tell that I had been there.

I ride off towards White Works Cottage and join the Princetown track at Nuns Cross. When I get to Princetown I briefly ride on tarmac back towards Yelverton before turning off and heading off-piste back towards Burrator and Devonport Leat. There’s no track here, so it’s a bit slower going. The sun is warm and there is only the most gentle of breezes, it’s a beautiful day to be out on a bike. Eventually I pick up the trail that runs beside the Leat, it’s dry, hard packed and runs nice and quick. I let the bike run, picking up speed and the tyres start to hum.

There’s nothing quite like good fast singletrack, for me it’s one of the greatest pleasures in mountain biking. It’s over way to soon as I’m dumped back onto the road that runs around the reservoir. I leave it as soon as I can, heading up a nice trail along the side of Sheeps Tor. This trail ends at Joey’s Lane, a nice technical rocky track with numerous rock drop offs. It’s a short trip back on tarmac until I get to the start of one of my favourite descents, Banana Trail. It’s a steep drop down through the woods beside the dam, lot’s of rooty drop offs and tight switchback turns. With all the camping kit the bike is heavy and hard to slow down, by the time I get to the bottom I have a grin a mile wide. Not only am I alive, but I still have all my limbs! I cross the river at the bottom and stop for a coffee on the edge of a meadow.  

I take time now to do some wood carving with the bushcraft knife I made a few weeks ago. I make myself a spoon, not because I need one but just because I’ve never made one before. I while the time away sat in the sun drinking coffee and wood carving, the sound of the water flowing over the rocks beside me, and the gentle song of birds are the only sounds here. I can’t put off the inevitable much longer though. It’s time for me to leave the woods and head home. I stop back in at Rockin Bikes on the way home for a coffee and a chat, before picking up cycle route 27 and heading back into Plymouth. By the time I arrive back at the house I’ve done fifty five miles, that’s not even remotely epic. It doesn’t matter though, I got away from the rat race, the people, the constant buzz of an increasingly technological society and I grounded myself back in the earth.

Go ride your bike, ride it to the shop, ride it to the pub, ride it around the world. It doesn’t matter how far you go, as long as you go. 

 

Follow Trev on Instagram @bikepakingtrev